Daily News Roundup, April 14, 2014

Perspectives: News You Can Use
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT HIGHER ED

NEW AFT CAMPAIGN ON ‘PROMISE OF HIGHER EDUCATION
The American Federation of Teachers on Friday announced a new campaign, "The Promise of Higher Education," to focus attention on policies that the union said are hurting students and faculty members. The AFT is planning efforts both to draw attention to and challenge these policies. "Higher education should be about expanding opportunities for middle- and working-class families, not a 'debt sentence,' and not a way for Wall Street and for-profit colleges to profit off of students and families," said AFT President Randi Weingarten in a speech announcing the new campaign. "Together we can reclaim the promise of higher education as a means to opportunity and success." The information is from Inside Higher Ed’s Quick Takes.

FROM SLIPPING THROUGH THE CRACKS TO COLLEGE TRACK
Between crisis management and clerical duties, school counselors — once the conduit to college — have little time to help students navigate a complex maze of higher-education requirements. The fix? Look beyond the schoolhouse. The article is in the Seattle Times.

STUDENTS IN RURAL AREAS LESS LIKELY TO GO TO FOUR-YEAR UNIVERSITIES
Students in rural counties are less likely to attend college, and those who do are less likely to choose a four-year, private, or highly selective institution, according to a recent report. Andrew Koricich, an assistant professor of higher education at Texas Tech University analyzed federal higher education and longitudinal data to determine how living in a rural community influences postsecondary choices. Koricich’s study found that about 64 percent of rural students pursue postsecondary education, compared to nearly 70 percent of students who live in metro areas. Nationally, about 66 percent of graduating high school students enroll in a postsecondary institution. The article is in The Hechinger Report.

ABOUT K-12

STUDENTS IN IMPOVERISHED SCHOOLS LESS LIKELY TO HAVE EFFECTIVE TEACHERS, REPORT SAYS
report released Friday by the Center for American Progress relies on data from Louisiana and Massachusetts, both early adopters of teacher rating systems, to conclude poor and minority students are two to three times more likely to have ineffective teachers. The article is in the New Orleans Times-Picayune.

ROSY INDIANA EVALUATION RESULTS TRIGGER SOUL-SEARCHING
Indiana is the latest state to unveil results from an overhauled teacher-evaluation system, and similar to many other states, the results are almost entirely rosy. The Associated Press reported that 88 percent of teachers and administrators were rated as either effective or highly effective under the system; only about 2 percent need improvement, and less than a half a percent were deemed ineffective. About 10 percent of teachers weren't rated because their collective-bargaining agreements hadn't been updated yet. It's the first year the system has included some measure of student progress, such as standardized test scores. Lawmakers don't seem very happy by this turn of events. After all, the new systems are costlier and demand much more of principals' time than before. The post is from Education Week’s Teacher Beat blog.

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options


Bottom