Daily News Roundup, August 12, 2014

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT HIGHER ED

BLACK MEN NEED MORE EDUCATION THAN WHITE MEN TO GET JOBS
A recent report from the advocacy group Young Invincibles suggests not: African American millennial men need two or more levels of education to have the same employment prospects as their white peers. White male college graduates have a 97.6% employment rate. Black male college graduates have a 92.8% employment rate—which correlates more closely with the job prospects for white men who have some college education but no degree (92.5%). The 19th century reformer Horace Mann may have called education the great equalizer, but 150 years later, the numbers suggest otherwise. The reason for this is obvious—as the report points out, “the legacy of racial discrimination across centuries continues to impact economic disparities, and so young African Americans start on an uneven playing field.” The article is in The Atlantic.

BIG DATA MEASURING DOLLAR VALUE OF COLLEGE DEGREES
RALEIGH, N.C. — To make the most money coming out of a North Carolina university, study nuclear engineering and you'll earn almost $90,000 a year. To make the least, study dramatic theater and earn $10,400. Amid the sluggish economic recovery, many families are wondering how best to make their increasingly expensive investment in college pay off. North Carolina's public universities and community colleges have tried to provide an answer, by releasing the average salaries earned by students according to their major and campus. A handful of other states, including Texas and Florida, have released similar data and two-thirds of the states have received federal funding to track the progress of individual students from kindergarten to the workplace. The AP article is in the Raleigh News and Observer.

ABOUT K-12

PITCHING ‘NON-COMMON-CORE CURRICULUM’
Most publishers are scrambling to produce materials aligned to the common core, since those math and English/language arts guidelines are in effect in 43 states and the District of Columbia. But some, it seems, are keeping their eye on a niche market: parents who want to opt their kids out of those standards. Discovery K12 is a case in point. The publisher of free, online homeschooling curricula is aiming its product at common-core opponents, noting in its marketing materials that the common standards are "one of the main reasons" that parents are choosing to teach their children at home. (Whether research would bear this out as a "main reason" for homeschooling remains to be seen.) The post is from Education Week’s Curriculum Matters.

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