Daily News Roundup, August 14, 2014

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

SCALING UP YOUR VENTURE
Drawing on principles from their best-selling book, Scaling Up Excellence: How to Get More Without Settling for Less, Stanford professors Huggy Rao and Bob Sutton have developed a new five-week online course: Scaling Up Your Venture Without Screwing Up. During this course, participants will dive into key scaling concepts with thought-provoking lectures, interviews with successful venture capitalists and entrepreneurs, multimedia case studies, and team-based exercises, all capped by a live webinar. The key takeaway: scaling up is not simply about growth; it is also about implementing the practices that help people and teams do their work faster and more effectively. Rao was one of the most popular presenters at Carnegie’s Summit on Improvement in Education in March.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

WHITE HOUSE ANNOUNCES SECOND SUMMIT ON COLLEGE ACCESS
Seven months after the White House hosted a well-publicized summit on expanding college access, it announced on Wednesday plans for a second gathering, to be held December 4. According to a White House statement, the aim of the second summit will be to “build on the work” of the first one, “while launching initiatives in new areas.” It continues: “This year’s summit will focus on building sustainable collaborations in communities with strong K-12 and higher education partnerships to encourage college going, and supporting colleges to work together to dramatically improve persistence and increase college completion, especially for first generation, low-income, and underrepresented students.” To prepare for the previous summit, more than 100 institutions committed to new programs designed to enhance access for low-income students. At the event, 140 leaders of colleges, nonprofits, and businesses participated in small-group discussions, while also hearing from President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama. The post is from The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Ticker blog.

CONFUSE STUDENTS TO HELP THEM
Steve Kolowich writes in The Chronicle of Higher Education: Confusion is a powerful force in education. It can send students reeling toward boredom and complacency. But being confused can also prompt students to work through impasses and arrive at a more nuanced understanding of the world. "Common wisdom holds that confusion should be avoided during learning and rapidly resolved if and when it arises," wrote a team of researchers in a paper published earlier this year. While this might be true when it comes to superficial tasks such as memorizing facts and figures, "Confusion is likely to promote learning at deeper levels of comprehension under appropriate conditions."

ABOUT K-12

DESPITE TRAINING, HALF OF TEACHERS FEEL INADEQUATELY PREPARED TO TEACH COMMON CORE
Teachers are getting steadily more training in the common core, but they're not feeling much more prepared to teach it, according to survey results released Thursday by the Education Week Research Center. The study, "From Adoption to Practice: Teacher Perspectives on the Common Core," shows that while far more teachers are attending common-core training, they are giving those sessions low marks for quality. Those findings were drawn from an online survey given to registered users of edweek.org in October 2013. The pool of respondents is not nationally representative, but it is a snapshot of a diverse group of 457 teachers in states that adopted the common core. The post is from Education Week’s Curriculum Matters blog.

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