Daily News Roundup, August 21, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

STUDENTS NOT PREPARED FOR RIGOR OF COLLEGE, ACT DATA SHOW
The report released today by the Iowa City, Iowa-based organization found just 39% of test-takers in the class of 2013 met three or more of the ACT college-readiness benchmarks in English, reading, science, and math. Nearly one-third did not meet any. View the new ACT report on college readiness. The article is in Education Week.

MOST AMERICANS UNAWARE OF COMMON CORE
Nearly two out of three Americans have never heard of the Common Core State Standards, and among those who have, fewer than half believe the new, more rigorous academic goals in English/language arts and mathematics adopted by all but four states so far will make the United States more competitive in the world, according to a new poll from Phi Delta Kappa and Gallup. The article is in Education Week.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

OBAMA TO OFFER PLANS TO EASE BURDEN OF PAYING FOR COLLEGE
WASHINGTON — President Obama will offer a series of proposals this week aimed at making college more affordable by reshaping the way Americans pay for higher education, he said in an e-mail to supporters on Tuesday. In the message, Mr. Obama promised to take action to confront the financial challenges facing an increasing number of students and their families. The average tuition at four-year colleges has tripled over the past three decades, and students who take out loans are left, on average, with $26,000 in debt, he said. The article is in The New York Times.

UDACITY CEO FIRES BACK AT CRITICS
After a summer of unexpected setbacks and amid a growing chorus of doubt, Udacity CEO Sebastian Thrun on Tuesday dismissed the idea that his company's model for high-quality, low-cost education isn't working. Speaking to Information Week, Thrun said the MOOC provider has almost "found the magic formula" for how to produce and run its online courses. Udacity hit a major snag last month after disappointing results led one of its two university partners, San Jose State University, to pause its partnership. According to a leaked report, students enrolled in the $150 classes provided by Udacity performed much worse than their peers in traditional courses -- especially in remedial math. Thrun maintains the data was published "in an incomplete form, with a very strong bias," and that results from summer courses will show that more than half of the students passed their courses. Thrun said the numbers should provide an incentive for San Jose State to resume the partnership in 2014.This information is from Inside Higher Ed’s Quick Takes.

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