Daily News Roundup, December 5, 2012

Perspectives: News You Can Use
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT HIGHER ED

RETHINKING GRANTS AND LOANS
WASHINGTON -- A report released today calls for an overhaul of the federal financial aid system, including ending subsidized loans, enrolling students in income-based repayment, and directing the savings from the changes to the Pell Grant. The report, “Increasing Return on Investment from Federal Student Aid,” was written by the National College Access Network and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, part of the philanthropy's push to influence financial aid policy. In all, the Gates Foundation awarded $3.3 million in grants to 16 groups for white papers on how to change the financial aid system to encourage college completion. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

DESIGNING A SYSTEM THAT WORKS
Educators, employers, and young people are like "ships passing in the night," unable to connect the millions of unemployed college graduates with the companies struggling to fill vacancies, according to the lead author of a report released on Tuesday by McKinsey & Company. The report, "Education to Employment: Designing a System That Works," is based on the consulting firm's survey of 8,500 educators, employers, and young people in nine countries: Brazil, Britain, Germany, India, Mexico, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United States. It also includes findings from 130 programs that seek to connect college graduates with jobs. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

ABOUT K-12

ARNE DUNCAN SKETCHES OUT LONG HAUL AGENDA
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, who says he plans to serve in the Obama Cabinet for the "long haul," has begun sketching out his priorities for the next four years. They include using competitive levers to improve teacher and principal quality and holding the line on initiatives he started during the president's first term. The secretary is also making clear what he won't do: devote a lot of energy to a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act if Congress doesn't get serious about rewriting the current version, the No Child Left Behind Act. The article is in Education Week.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS WORK TOWARDS COMMON CORE
Some states, including Illinois, have recently adopted new public school curriculum guidelines called the Common Core State Standards. While some teachers feel relief at having clear guidelines, Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW reports from Chicago on a more contentious aspect of the new implementation: student and teacher evaluation. The piece was on PBS NewsHour.
 

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options


Bottom