Daily News Roundup, February 15, 2012

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

$5 BILLION IN OBAMA PROPOSAL TO OVERHAUL TEACHING PROFESSION
The Obama administration will propose a $5 billion competitive grant program to encourage states to overhaul the teaching profession, federal education officials said Tuesday, using its Race to the Top school improvement competition as a model. The article is in The New York Times.

RETHINKING TESTING IN THE ERA OF THE IPAD
In the 3,200-student East Haven schools in Connecticut, elementary teachers did their initial student reading assessments a bit differently this school year. Instead of using paper and pencil to jot down observations about each of their students and then collecting and analyzing those notes by hand, each teacher used an iPad to collect the information and send it to a centralized database through software from the New York City-based ed-tech company Wireless Generation. "One of our primary goals was to be able to develop a system that would bring a lot of the data into one place," says Taylor Auger, a technology-integration teacher in the district who helped incorporate use of the iPads into classrooms. (Wireless Generation's founder and chief executive officer is Larry Berger, who is also a Carnegie Board member.)

ABOUT HIGHER ED

RACIAL TRANSFER GAP AT CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGES
California community colleges with the lowest student transfer rates to four-year colleges are "intensely segregated" or enroll high percentages of minority students, according to three new reports from the Civil Rights Project at the University of California at Los Angeles, while a "handful" of two-year colleges that serve largely white, Asian or middle-class students are responsible for the majority of transfers in the state. The group's third report takes on California's master plan, and calls for some the state's top community colleges to be given the authority to grant bachelor degrees. The article is in Inside Higher Ed’s Quick Takes.

REPORT SUGGESTS POLICIES TO BETTER SERVE NONTRADITIONAL STUDENTS
Serving nontraditional students is crucial to efforts to boost degree completion in the United States, but the higher-education system was not set up with that population in mind. The Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance released a report on Tuesday highlighting input from a recent hearing on the challenges nontraditional students face, best practices from states and colleges, and ideas of how the federal government could help, particularly by improving data collection and financial aid. This information is from The Chronicle of Higher Education.
 

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