Daily News Roundup, January 10, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT HIGHER ED

BENEFITS OF A COLLEGE DEGREE IN A RECESSION OUTLINED
Young adults have long faced a rough job market, but in the last recession and its aftermath, college graduates did not lose nearly as much ground as their less-educated peers, according to a new study. The study, published on Wednesday by the Pew Charitable Trusts, shows that among Americans age 21 to 24, the drop in employment and income was much steeper among people who lacked a college degree. The article is in The New York Times.

NEW LOOK FOR LUMINA
The big goal for the Lumina Foundation hasn’t changed, but the powerful foundation has come up with a new set of strategies to boost America's proportion of college graduates to 60 percent by 2025. The foundation’s leaders said times have changed in the four years since they assumed their role in helping to push the completion agenda. And they have new ideas about how to spend $300 million over the next four years, with focuses on building a social movement, targeting metropolitan areas and encouraging innovations based on student learning and competencies rather than the credit hour. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

POSTSECONDARY ENROLLMENT GROWTH PROJECTED TO CONTINUE TO SLOW
Postsecondary enrollments will grow by 15 percent between 2010 and 2021, far less than the 46 percent increase that occurred between 1996 and 2010, the U.S. Education Department's National Center for Education Statistics said in an annual report released Wednesday. The report, "Projections of Education Statistics Through 2021," provides a slew of data that anticipate how key K-12 and higher education indicators (enrollments, degrees conferred, etc.) will change over the next decade. By comparison, last year's report projected a 13 percent increase in college enrollments between 2009 and 2020; whether the uptick is a sign that the "completion agenda" is having an effect will be a subject for debate. This year's report also projects a 21 percent increase in the number of associate degrees awarded by 2021-22, a 21 percent increase in the number of bachelor's degrees, a 34 percent rise in the number of master's degrees, and a 24 percent upturn in the number of doctoral degrees. In all cases those numbers are roughly half the number awarded in the 1996-97 to 2009-2010 period. The information is from Inside Higher Ed’s Quick Takes.

ABOUT K-12

STATES SHOW SPOTTY PROGRESS ON EDUCATION GAUGES
The 17th edition of Education Week's Quality Counts continues the report's tradition of tracking key education indicators and grading the states on their policy efforts and outcomes. Each year, Quality Counts provides new results for a portion of the policy-and-performance categories that form the framework for the report's State-of-the-States analysis. The 2013 edition presents updated scores and letter grades, for the states and the nation as a whole, in three of the six major areas tracked in the report. A majority of states fell near the middle of the overall grading curve, with 38 states earning grades between a C-minus and a C-plus. Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and Virginia earned the highest overall grades.

GEORGIA’S NEW TEACHER EVALUATION SYSTEM DISAPPOINTING
The trial run of Georgia’s new teacher assessment system is not returning the results that lawmakers and education experts were hoping for, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports. According to preliminary results made available earlier this month, only a small percentage of teachers evaluated under the new system were found to be performing below par – making observers skeptical that those who are administering new evaluations were doing so correctly. The pilot covered about 5,800 teachers from around the state, and fewer than 1% received the worst scores while nearly 20% were graded as exemplary – the highest score possible. According to state education officials, this is a strong indication that the way the program is being implemented needs to be adjusted to make sure that the outcomes are realistic by the time it rolls out to the entire state during the 2014-2015 academic year. The article is in EducationNews.org.
 

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