Daily News Roundup, January 10, 2014

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

LOOKING FOR NEW WAYS TO BETTER PREPARE, RETAIN TEACHERS
Finding good teachers and then keeping them is difficult for many school districts with high needs. It’s estimated that nearly half of new teachers leave teaching within the first five years, and that turnover takes a toll on schools and children. A 2007 study by the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future estimated that the national cost of public school teacher turnover could be over $7.3 billion a year. Because of this problem, many education policy experts are looking for better ways to train teachers so they’ll be better prepared for the classroom and more likely to stay in teaching. Among the new approaches are apprenticeship programs and teacher residency programs, which offer more training and support so schools can attract and retain good teachers. WBUR’s Sacha Pfeiffer discusses several of these types of programs, including the Boston Teacher Residency and Newton Teacher Residency with Kay Merseth, a senior lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a former Carnegie Senior Fellow, and Jesse Solomon, director and founder of Boston Teacher Residency.

WHAT DO OBAMA’S PROMISE ZONES HAVE TO DO WITH EDUCATION?
San Antonio, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Southeastern Kentucky, and the Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma were all tapped today by President Barack Obama to be the first areas designated as "Promise Zones", which is part of a great big Obama administration interagency collaboration aimed at bolstering economic development in high poverty communities. The U.S.  Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Department of Justice, and the Department of Agriculture all have a piece of this action. How much money do each of these areas get from the feds, due to their designation as a Promise Zone? None, directly. Instead, they get help from the administration in cutting federal bureaucratic red tape. The post is from Education Week’s Politics K-12 blog.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

GOVERNOR BROWN’S BUDGET AND EDUCATION
California Gov. Jerry Brown released a budget proposal that calls for a $1.9 billion rainy day fund, cuts to the prison population and some funds restored to the state's higher education system. However, state workers hoping to see more in their pension funds will be disappointed. The piece ran on NPR’s All Things Considered.

IS COLLEGE STILL WORTH IT?
Ricardo Azziz, Georgia Regents University president, writes in the Huffington Post: Do a simple Google News search on "higher education" and chances are you'll get a lot of hits -- stories about how expensive it is, how much debt students are accumulating, whether college graduates are faring any better in tough economic times than anyone else, whether a college education really translates into a better future. Cumulatively, they beg the question, "Is a college education worth it?" Recent poll results obtained by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) shed some light on what Americans think about the value of a college education. The data shows the public is split on the question, with college graduates more than twice as likely to say, "Yes, it's worth it," than non-college graduates (62 to 30 percent, respectively).

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