Daily News Roundup, January 18, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

NEW YORK: NO DEAL ON TEACHER EVALUATIONS
The Bloomberg administration and New York City’s teachers’ union said Thursday that they had failed to reach a deal on a new system for evaluating 75,000 public school teachers, putting the city into immediate danger of losing out on up to $450 million in state and federal money and raising the possibility of cuts to staff and programs. The article is in The New York Times.

COMMON ASSESSMENTS HOLD PROMISE, FACE CHALLENGES, STUDY FINDS
Tests now being designed for the Common Core standards are likely to gauge deeper levels of learning and have a major impact on instruction, according to a new study. The report concludes that the assessments hold promise for improving teacher practice and student learning. But the authors caution that the test-making projects face key financial, technical, and political challenges that could affect their success. The post is from Education Week’s Curriculum Matters blog.

SEATTLE HIGH SCHOOL'S TEACHERS TOSS DISTRICT’S TEST
An entire school of teachers in Seattle is refusing to give students a standardized test that's required by the district. The teachers say the test is useless and wastes valuable instructional time. Meanwhile, individual teacher protests of standardized tests are popping up nationwide, and the Seattle case may make bigger waves. The piece is from NPR’s All Things Considered.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

MEASURING THE SUCCESS OF ONLINE EDUCATION
One of the dirty secrets about MOOCs — massive open online courses — is that they are not very effective, at least if you measure effectiveness in terms of completion rates. If as few as 20 percent of students finishing an online course is considered a wild success and 10 percent and lower is standard, then it would appear that MOOCs are still more of a hobby than a viable alternative to traditional classroom education. The post is from The New York Times’ Bits blog.

WHAT IS MERIT?
LOS ANGELES -- After a morning here in which admissions leaders and legal experts discussed strategies for colleges to look beyond the grades and test scores of applicants, Art Coleman said that it was time to acknowledge the "proverbial elephant in the room." That's the issue of merit. Coleman is a lawyer who has worked with numerous colleges and higher education groups to craft admissions policies that promote diversity and can also survive legal challenges. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

NEW PRESSURE ON COLLEGES TO DISCLOSE GRADS’ EARNINGS
Efforts to disclose the earnings potential of degrees in specific majors from colleges and universities are picking up steam, promising to bring competitive pressure to bear on institutions by steering students away from programs with lower market value and colleges whose graduates fare poorly. Wage information has been made available in several states and a bill in Congress would require every college to disclose such data. The article is from the Hechinger Report.
 

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