Daily News Roundup, January 24, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

TRUE GRIT: CAN PERSEVERANCE BE TAUGHT?
Angela Duckworth, a leading researcher on the topic of grit and educational achievement, presented her research on how non-cognitive competencies can predict academic and professional success at a TEDx event.  Duckworth is Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

TO RAISE GRADUATION RATE, COLLEGES ARE URGED TO HELP A CHANGING STUDENT BODY
In an effort to improve the college completion rate and fend off new regulations, a commission of the nation’s six leading higher-education associations is calling for extensive reforms to serve a changing college population — one increasingly composed of older and part-time students. The article is in The New York Times.

RECONCEIVING COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROCEDURES TO IMPROVE STUDENTS SUCCESS
The US has made a serious commitment to “college for all,” and community colleges are a primary vehicle for expanding college access. Yet as community colleges have succeeded in opening access to broad populations, their degree completion rates are low. Community colleges have retained many traditional procedures that are counter-productive for disadvantaged students and inappropriate for new labor market demands. Some colleges, however, have devised alternative procedures that are better adapted to real student needs. This brief describes common organizational failures and examines alternative procedures that enable student success. This policy brief is from the Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford.

LEARNING FROM MOOCS
Cousera co-founder Andrew Ng writes in Inside Higher Ed: Educators create online courses for the same reasons that they became teachers to begin with: to educate students, broaden their awareness of the world and thereby improve the students’ lives. And with massive open online courses (MOOCs), educators can now reach many more students at a time. But MOOCs offer many other benefits to the education community, including providing valuable lessons to the instructors who teach them.

FRESHMAN SURVEY: MORE FOCUSED ON JOBS
Today's freshmen are focused on the future. They are certain they'll finish their degrees in four years, despite evidence to the contrary; they want to land good jobs after graduation; and they increasingly aspire to be well-off. Those are among the many findings of the 2012 Freshman Survey, published on Thursday by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program, part of the Higher Education Research Institute at the University of California at Los Angeles. The annual survey delves into nearly every aspect of first-year students' lives: study habits,
religious beliefs, family income, career goals, even exercise habits. This year's survey was administered last fall to 192,912 first-time,full-time students at 283 four-year colleges and universities. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

ABOUT K-12

‘INSIDERS’ NOT SANGUINE ON FEDERAL TEACHER PREP REGULATIONS
Stephen Sawchuk writes for Education Week’s Teacher Beat blog: Nearly two-thirds of the "education insiders" questioned in a recent survey are skeptical that the U.S. Department of Education "will take concrete steps to improve teacher preparation in 2013," according to a release today from Whiteboard Advisors, a Washington-based consultancy. The group periodically surveys insiders—think former Capitol Hill staffers, agency appointees, and policy wonks—for their insight into current federal education policy matters. The latest survey shows that just 36 percent of those surveyed think that the ED will make a mark on teacher preparation this year.

 

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