Daily News Roundup, January 29, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

Some of the News Fit to Print

BILL GATES: MY PLAN TO FIX THE WORLD’S BIGGEST PROBLEMS
Bill Gates writes in the Wall Street Journal: In the past year, I have been struck by how important measurement is to improving the human condition. You can achieve incredible progress if you set a clear goal and find a measure that will drive progress toward that goal—in a feedback loop similar to the one Mr. Rosen describes. The article is in the Wall Street Journal.

DOCTOR/PROFESSOR
Atul Gawande, author and professor at Harvard University, candidly explains what the education field can learn from top performers in the medicine, sports, and music fields--and how coaching is at the heart of learning  in a Harvard EdCast.

ABOUT K-12

ED DEPARTMENT RAISES EVIDENCE, RESEARCH ANTE IN GRANT AWARDS
Using the Investing in Innovation program as a building block, the U.S. Department of Education is taking the next formal step to make research and evidence far more important factors as it awards competitive grants. The goal is twofold: to reward projects that already have established a research-based track record of success and to encourage grant winners to produce rigorous evidence detailing the extent to which their project does—or does not—work. To make that happen, the Education Department is proposing significant changes to an arcane, bureaucratic set of rules known as EDGAR, or the Education Department General Administrative Regulations, as part of a governmentwide push to introduce more evidence into decisionmaking. The article is in Education Week.

ISSUE TO WATCH: SCHOOL TESTING
At least four governors are looking to join more than a dozen other states that have passed laws requiring 3rd-grade students to demonstrate that they can read at grade level before entering 4th grade. While a couple of states are questioning whether there is already too much testing, other governors are pushing schools to be graded on an A to F scale based on student performance. And more than 30 states have made test results a factor in measuring teacher performance.  The article is from Stateline.org.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

NOT RUSHING INTO MOOCS
News of universities partnering with massive open online course providers has become commonplace, which is why Yale University stands out for what it’s not doing: rushing. While many top universities -- including Harvard and Stanford Universities, along with many others -- were announcing partnerships and launching their first MOOCs, Yale sat back, watched, and evaluated. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

PROFESSORS SAY TECHNOLOGY HELPS IN LOGISTICS, NOT LEARNING
With PowerPoint presentations, YouTube videos, and online portals, technology is playing an increasingly important role in college classrooms and lecture halls. But are those technologies improving learning?A study published this month in the journal Science, Technology, & Human Values found that professors at research-intensive universities believe the answer to that question is no. A report on the study, “Technological Change and Professional Control in the Professoriate,” includes interviews with more than 40 professors at three universities. It suggests that professors often use such technologies for logistical purposes rather than to improve learning. The post is from The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Wired blog.

MILLIONS OF GRADS HOLD JOBS THAT DO NOT REQUIRE A COLLEGE DEGREE
Millions of college graduates over all -- not just recent ones -- suffer a mismatch between education and employment, holding jobs that don't require a college degree, according to a new report. Out of 41.7 million working college graduates in 2010, 48% -- more than 20 million people -- held jobs that required less than a bachelor's degree. Thirty-seven percent held jobs that required no more than a high-school diploma. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.
 

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options


Bottom