Daily News Roundup, January 31, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

RE-THINKING THE NOTION OF 'NON-COGNITIVE'
David T. Conley suggests that in elevating content-cognitive knowledge above noncognitive attitudes and beliefs we miss a richer, more nuanced view of learning that includes all learning processes and behaviors. Gaining insight into noncognitive issues "would enable educators to teach students how to learn, as well as what to learn," he writes, advocating for the term metacognition instead of noncognitive.  The commentary is in Education Week.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

CAN FUNDING BE FAIR?
The 10-campus University of California likes to style itself as one university. It has one governing board that sets the same tuition rates for all campuses, its campuses use the same admissions process and it has one line in the state budget. But it values students at its campuses differently.  In 2009, the Santa Cruz campus received $6,723 in state funding per full-time student (both graduate and undergraduate), according to the Delta Cost Project. The Los Angeles campus received $14,736 per student. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

REPORT ON STUDENT-AID REFORM CALLS FOR MAKING PELL GRANTS AN ENTITLEMENT
Expanding the Pell Grant program, reducing student-loan debt, and eliminating tuition tax breaks are necessary steps toward improving the federal financial-aid system, according to a new report. The report proposes specific policy changes that would reorganize several hundreds of billions of dollars in spending to deal with what the authors say are inefficiencies in postsecondary financial aid. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

ABOUT K-12

CUOMO: STATE MIGHT IMPOSE EVALUATIONS
State officials will impose their own job evaluation system on New York City's teachers if a deal isn't reached soon between the union and the city, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday. Mr. Cuomo vowed to sign a new law empowering the state Education Department to act as a binding arbitrator in the negotiations unless an agreement was reached "shortly," he said. The failure to reach a deal by a deadline earlier this month already cost the city's school system about $240 million. The article is in the Wall Street Journal.

 

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