Daily News Roundup, July 18, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

HOW SHOULD TEACHERS BE PAID?
Arguments around changes to teacher compensation have been heating up all across the country. In Tennessee, for example, education officials just put a new plan in place that eliminates annual step raises given solely for experience and advanced degrees, asking districts to also consider factors such as test scores and whether a teacher works in a high-needs school. The state's teachers' union has come out firmly against it, saying it could lower teaching requirements and overall teacher pay. A roundtable of teachers takes on this question for Education Week.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

GRADUATION GAPS BETWEEN MINORITY AND WHITE STUDENTS SLOWLY NARROW
The graduation gap between minority and white college students is slowly narrowing, and the campuses having the most success aren't necessarily the wealthiest or most selective, according to a new report by the Education Trust. "Colleges that decide student success is the No. 1 priority have been able to move the needle even with decreasing levels of state support," the report's author, Joseph Yeado, a higher-education research and policy analyst for the Education Trust, said in an interview on Wednesday. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

UDACITY PROJECT ON ‘PAUSE’
After six months of high-profile experimentation, San Jose State University plans to “pause” its work with Udacity, a company that promises to deliver low-cost, high-quality online education to the masses. The decision will likely be seen as a setback for a unique partnership announced in January by California Gov. Jerry Brown in a 45-minute news conference with university officials and Udacity CEO Sebastian Thrun. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

GRADUATES DISENGAGED
A new survey suggests that even if new college graduates are employed, many aren’t particularly happy. College graduates whose highest educational attainment is a bachelor’s degree say they are less engaged at work than people who completed some or no college. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

SENATORS: TOO MUCH FOCUS ON COLLEGE DEGREES
With federal student loan debt mounting across the country, lawmakers across the political aisle are in agreement that Washington must help emphasize that jobs training can be just as valuable to young Americans as a college degree. Speaking at Politico’s Jobs of the Future event Wednesday, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) said the out-of-control level of student loan debt in the United States is in part due to the widespread suggestion that a young person is a “second-class citizen” if he or she doesn’t attain a four-year college degree.

PROCESS OVER PRODUCT
University of Kansas journalism professor Doug Ward writes in Inside Higher Ed: Many universities seem taken aback by the assertions that they offer an education that is less than stellar. With a steady stream of students knocking at the door, they haven’t had to. They also lack the ability to make rapid, radical changes. In that regard, they are like most large organizations, whether in business or in government. The structures they have put in place are complex and inter-reliant, yet need constant remaking to remain relevant.

SENATE REACHES DEAL OVER STUDENT LOAN INTEREST RATES
WASHINGTON — Senators negotiating a bipartisan deal to keep student loan rates low reached a deal on Wednesday night that could end the partisan feud on Capitol Hill that has threatened to permanently double interest rates. The article is in The New York Times.

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