Daily News Roundup, March 21, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT HIGHER ED

IDEAL MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE PREPARATION
Charles Coble's Ten Key Questions emerged from his work on the Analytic Framework, a continuum of teacher development strategies from recruitment to professional development. As the Framework became more complex, leaders asked for the most critical components of a quality teacher preparation program. Hence the questions, among them: Does the selection process into teacher preparation attract candidates with demonstrated academic success? Do the programs blend disciplinary and pedagogical content? Do teacher education programs include formal support to their novice teachers through an induction period as a part of their formal program? This information is from the Education Commission of the States.

LIGHTER TEACHING LOADS FOR FACULTY CONTRIBUTE TO RISING COLLEGE COSTS
The rising cost of college can't be blamed just on dwindling state appropriations or inflation, according to a report released on Wednesday by Education Sector and the American Council of Trustees and Alumni. A decline in the teaching loads of tenured and tenure-track faculty members also plays a role, it says, driving up tuition costs by an average of $2,598 for students at four-year colleges over a seven-year period it studied. The report, called "Selling Students Short: Declining Teaching Loads at Colleges and Universities," says the decline in teaching loads "has had a dramatic influence on the spiraling costs of higher education." The report's author, Andrew Gillen, who is Education Sector's research director, says that examining why teaching loads have become lighter despite greater instructional needs could provide relief for students and families who are struggling to keep pace with tuition increase

ABOUT K-12

‘A-PLUS’ COUNTRIES FALTER ON INTERNATIONAL MATH STUDY
Ongoing overhauls of state mathematics standards are intended in part to prepare American students to compete with their international peers. Yet a new analysis of the most recent Trends in International Math and Science Study suggests that so-called "A-plus countries"— whose math achievement in 1995 prompted American educators to take a page from their standards in developing the Common Core State Standards in math—have not sustained that achievement in more recent exams, and that better examples of academic leaders might be found closer to home. The analysis, "The Latest TIMSS and PIRLS Scores," was released this week as part of an annual report on education by the Brookings Institution's Brown Center on Education Policy, which also looked at 8th grade advanced math courses and ability grouping and tracking issues in reading and math. The post is from Education Weeks’ Inside School Research blog.

CAN BETTER ORGANIZATION PRODUCE MORE GRADUATES?
Under Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber's education overhaul, every student will have to meet academic milestones on the road from preschool to college. To reinforce this unified approach, Kitzhaber appointed a chief education officer who is charged with overseeing every stage of education. Oregon is part of a small but growing number of states trying to improve academic results by aligning the education system. The article is from Stateline.org.

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