Daily News Roundup, May 1, 2014

Perspectives: News You Can Use
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version

Some of the News Fit to Print

WHY ‘VALUE-ADDED’ METRICS ARE REALLY JUST THE OPPOSITE
Beverly Falk writes for the Hechinger Report: As the parent of children who attended public schools and an educator who has been a teacher of children, a school leader, and now a teacher-educator and director of a teacher-education program, I welcome the Obama administration’s efforts to ensure that educator preparation programs support their graduates to do the absolute best for the children entrusted to their care. How they do this, however, can be helpful or harmful, depending on the kind of information they use to hold programs accountable and on what is done as a result of collecting that information.

ABOUT K-12

MAKING THE MOST OF EDUCATION RESEARCH
Aspen Institute authors write: “While there is broad acknowledgment within policy and practice circles of the important and long-standing federal role in education research, there is no agreement on how to focus limited federal dollars on our nation’s most pressing education needs. Indeed, despite all the activity in multiple federal agencies, you’d be hard-pressed to find a teacher, principal, or even a district superintendent who points to the value of federally funded research in his or her day-to-day work.” The commentary is in Education Week.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

COLLEGE RATING SYSTEM WILL GO FORWARD, DUNCAN SAYS
The U.S. Department of Education plans to continue its push for a college-rating system, even if Congress doesn’t shell out the $10-million the agency is requesting to develop the program and put it in place. The Obama administration requested $82.3-billion for the department in the 2015 fiscal year, which begins on October 1. The amount is $1.3-billion more than the current year’s budget, an increase that is second only to the Department of Veterans Affairs. A line item in the department’s request says it would use $10-million to support "further development and refinement of a new college-rating system. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

FROM COMMUNITY COLLEGE TO LAW SCHOOL IN CALIFORNIA
California's community college system today will announce the creation of a smoother pathway for students from 24 of the state's community colleges to eventually gain entry to six law schools in California. The agreement, which was brokered by the State Bar of California, will provide law school-related resources to students at two-year institutions, including financial aid counseling, academic advising and LSAT prep. And the six participating law schools -- which include ones based at the University of Southern California and the University of California at Davis -- agreed to waive application fees and take various other steps to increase the pipeline of community college students. The article is from Inside Higher Ed’s Quick Takes.

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options


Bottom