Daily News Roundup, November 21, 2011

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

CALIFORNIANS SUPPORT MAKING TEACHERS’ REVIEWS PUBLIC
California voters want teachers' performance evaluations made public, a new poll has found. And most also want student test scores factored into an instructor's review. Of those surveyed, 58% said the quality of public schools would be improved if the public had access to teachers' reviews; 23% said it would not help or could make things worse. "They want to see the evaluations," said Linda DiVall, the chief executive of American Viewpoint, a Republican firm that co-directed the bipartisan poll for the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and the Los Angeles Times. "Just like with corporate America, there is the same desire here for transparency and accountability." The article is in the L.A. Times.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

MOST TWO-YEAR STUDENTS QUIT
Most City University of New York community college students drop out before graduating, squandering the system's resources as enrollment soars, according to a report set to be released today. The study by the Center for an Urban Future, a Manhattan think tank, highlights a problem with national implications: Too many students arrive at community colleges without having learned basic reading and math concepts. Most must take developmental courses that provide no credit toward a degree but still cost as much as college-level courses. The article is in the Wall Street Journal.

COLLEGE GRADUATION RATES: INCOME REALLY MATTERS
NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- It's getting more difficult for low-income students to climb the economic ladder as the college graduation gap between the rich and poor grows. While more students from all backgrounds are finishing college, the difference in graduation rates between the top and bottom income groups has widened by nearly 50% over two decades.  And since education is a key driver of upward mobility, this gulf means that it's even harder for the poor to prosper.

HIGHER ED RESEARCH ROUNDUP
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- With much of the potential drama of the annual meeting having unfolded before it began -- with the cancellation of a planned session on the validity of the National Survey of Student Engagement -- there was no obvious center of gravity as the members of the Association for the Study of Higher Education gathered here. Instead, the conference offered its usual dizzying array of topics for exploration -- from student access and persistence to the changing role of the faculty to countless sessions on diversity. Inside Higher Ed provides some highlights.
 

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