Daily News Roundup, November 26, 2012

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

COLLEGE READINESS EXAM TO REPLACE GRAD TEST
Ohio will drop its high-school graduation test and replace it with a tougher college-readiness exam and a series of end-of-course tests, state officials announced. The new assessments will gauge whether students are prepared for college or ready for careers, benchmarks that the Ohio Graduation Test doesn't measure.  The article is in the Columbus Dispatch.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

FINANCE POLICY AND BROAD-ACCESS PUBLIC COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES: OPPORTUNITIES TO SPUR INCREASES IN STUDENT SUCCESS
Finance policy plays an important role in supporting success in higher education. Most state finance policies have been developed primarily to address selective research and flagship universities, not broad-access schools. A new policy brief from the Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University identifies fiscal policies that provide disincentives for broad-access schools to improve student success, as well as opportunities to encourage improved performance at these schools going forward.

THE UNEVEN VALUE OF ACADEMIC CREDIT
The tight hold American colleges and universities have on academic credit—what it is worth and who awards it—is about to undergo a well overdue stress test. Two announcements in as many months have the potential to perhaps finally better define the value of credits in higher education. The post is from The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Next blog.

SKILLS DON’T PAY THE BILLS
Nearly six million factory jobs, almost a third of the entire manufacturing industry, have disappeared since 2000. And while many of these jobs were lost to competition with low-wage countries, even more vanished because of computer-driven machinery that can do the work of 10, or in some cases, 100 workers. Those jobs are not coming back, but many believe that the industry’s future (and, to some extent, the future of the American economy) lies in training a new generation for highly skilled manufacturing jobs — the ones that require people who know how to run the computer that runs the machine. The article was in The New York Times Magazine.

COLLEGE GRADS TAKING LOW PAYING JOBS
Throughout California, 260,000 recent college grads under the age of 30 are working on the front lines of food service and retail industries where historically those jobs have gone to workers without a degree. "We're seeing graduates in humanities and some of the arts fields struggling because perhaps what their degree is in doesn't translate well to the global current economy," said Ian Moats, a staffing consultant. Currently, the healthcare and technology sectors are growing. The article is in the Santa Barbara Key.

 

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