Daily News Roundup, October 15, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT K-12

DO TEACHER EVALUATIONS HELP OUT STUDENTS?
The American Institutes for Research is conducting a two-year study to determine whether teacher and principal evaluations have an effect on student learning. As part of the study, educators in Laramie, Wyoming, were trained in a more rigorous evaluation methods. The results from the new method will be compared with progress made at schools that did not make changes to their evaluation systems. The article is from the Wyoming Tribune-Eagle.

SCHOOL POVERTY—MORE THAN RACE—AFFECTS STUDENTS’ COLLEGE-GOING, STUDY FINDS
High-poverty schools sent significantly fewer graduates to college in 2012 than higher-income schools, regardless of the schools' geographic location or racial makeup, according to a new study by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Yet in the long-term, more students may be making it to college than previously realized. The post is from Education Week’s Inside School Research blog.

L.A. SCHOOLS DEFER IPADS, CITING SECURITY ISSUES
Four Los Angeles schools, scheduled to receive iPads in this first rollout of the tablets, have pulled out of the initial phase, saying that they want to wait at least until security and other issues are resolved. The rejection apparently is temporary — the schools still want the tablet computers — but their stance underscores ongoing problems faced by the L.A. Unified School District as it attempts to provide every student with a tablet over the next year. The article is in the L.A. Times.

ABOUT HIGHER ED

TRADITIONAL EDUCATION BEATS ONLINE IN KEY AREAS
We’re years into the era of online education, and yet Americans still hold a skeptical view of online learning’s quality and value to employers, according to the results of a Gallup survey released on Tuesday. In early October, Gallup asked two groups, each composed of more than 1,000 adults, whether they thought “online education is better” in a series of categories. In terms of “providing a wide range of options for curriculum” and “good value for the money,” online education got slightly better scores than traditional classroom-based education. The post is from The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Wired Campus blog.

A STUDY TO MEASURE THE VALUE OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES FALLS SHORT
A recent report issued by the Nexus Research and Policy Center and the American Institutes for Research, "What's the Value of an Associate's Degree? The Return on Investment for Graduates and Taxpayers," tackles an important topic that is timely for both college students and policy makers. Unfortunately, the report misses the mark in providing information on which either group can take action. The article is in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

SUCCESS IN THE STATES
Keeping up with the national college completion "agenda" can be tough. Foundation have created a messy mélange of strategies and organizations, often under the watchful eye of policy-minded state lawmakers, with the goal of getting more students to graduation. To try to pull together some of those threads in a coherent way, community college leaders in five states have created statewide "student success centers." And that approach may soon spread. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.


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