Daily News Roundup, October 18, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT HIGHER ED

NEW STANDARDS WILL DEMAND A LOT MORE OF TEACHER EDUCATION
Art Levine and Rick Ginsberg write in The Chronicle of Higher Education: Recent changes in standards for the programs that prepare the nation's teacher work force mark the beginning of a new era in teacher education. If the standards—approved in August by a new national accrediting body—are enforced properly, institutions that have used teacher education as a cash cow to pay for other priorities will no longer be able to do so. Instead, their programs will be judged by the real-world impact of their graduates in the classroom. The new standards will identify what high-quality programs should look like, force teacher-education programs to be more selective, use assessment of student learning as crucial evidence of teacher performance, and hold alternative providers, such as online programs and Teach for America, to the same high standard as that of campus-based programs.

CULTURE OF COMPLETION
Joshua Trader dropped out midway through his first semester at Delta College because the "timing wasn’t right." In doing so, he became another statistic of the sort often used to bemoan the performance of community colleges: of those pursuing two-year associate degrees, only 18.8 percent of full-time students graduate within four years, as do 7.8 percent of part-time students, according to a report from Complete College America. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

ABOUT K-12

CAN THE COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS TRANSFORM TEACHING AND RAISE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT?
The Hechinger Report and the Education Writers Association teamed up for a project to examine the potential impact of the Common Core standards. Reporters were sent to seven states, where they visited classrooms and teacher trainings, spoke with education leaders, principals, teachers and students, and followed the money to see how districts are financing the switch to new standards. The article is in the Hechinger Report.

THE GLOBAL RACE FOR ONLINE LEARNING: HOW DOES AMERICA COMPARE?
It seems that the tip of the iceberg has not even been chipped when it comes to online K-12 learning in the U.S. But how do we measure up to other countries? The short answer is that the U.S. is the leader in online learning due in part to our widespread access to broadband internet and how common it is in households and schools. Other nations are racing to catch up though. Education Week’s Education Futures blog takes a look at some of the efforts being made to improve online learning across the globe


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