Daily News Roundup, October 24, 2013

Perspectives: News You Can Use
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Some of the News Fit to Print

ABOUT HIGHER ED

DEGREES OF DISRUPTION
Supporters of open-access journals and massive open online courses have been quick to label their initiatives disruptive, but a recent analysis by a York University professor suggests only one of them has the potential to spark considerable change, while the other is likely to remain an alternative alongside traditional offerings. The article is in Inside Higher Ed.

HOW WILL EDUCATION EVOLVE TO BE MORE AFFORDABLE?
A new report shows the price of college is rising at a slower rate, but that does little to ease the struggle for affordable education, with fewer funds available for student aid and household incomes at a plateau. What options do students face? PBS’ Ray Suarez talks with education writer Jeff Selingo on NewsHour.

ABOUT K-12

SEVEN STATES AGREE TO PILOT TEACHER-PREP CHANGES
Seven states will overhaul their teacher-preparation and -licensing systems under a two-year pilot program created by Council of Chief State School Officers, the group announced today. The states are Connecticut, Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, and Washington. Generally, the states will be expected to carry out reforms aligned with the recommendations in a report a CCSSO task force issued last December. In brief, they include raising admission standards for teacher-preparation programs, making licensure contingent on candidates' demonstration of specific skills, and overhauling their process for approving programs. The post is from Education Week’s Teacher Beat blog.

BETTER NEWS IN NEW STUDY THAT ASSESSES U.S. STUDENTS
Amid growing alarm over the slipping international competitiveness of American students, a report comparing math and science test scores of eighth graders in individual states to those in other countries has found that a majority outperformed the international average. But the report, to be released today by the National Center for Education Statistics, an office of the Education Department, showed that even in the country’s top-performing states — which include Massachusetts, Vermont and Minnesota — fewer students scored at the highest levels than students in several East Asian countries. The article is in The New York Times.

STATE SUPE WILL EASE EVALUATION CONSEQUENCES IN COMMON CORE’S FIRST YEAR
Louisiana Superintendent John White plans to ease teacher and school evaluation consequences for this year because of the tension and stress of implementing a new math and English pedagogy under the Common Core. Teachers are working overtime to change their strategies and curricula to meet the demands of the new standards. Louisiana has opted to have districts create their own curricula for the standards.  The article is in the New Orleans Picayune-Times.


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