2018 Summit Pre-Conference Courses

Seven hands-on, pre-conference courses will be offered at the 2018 Carnegie Summit on April 3.

Summit pre-conferences


(PC1) Improvement Science Basics

NOTE: Enrollment in this course has reached capacity. To be added to the waitlist, email summitreg@carnegiefoundation.org with your first and last name, organization name and the course you want to attend. A waitlist confirmation will be sent within 48 hours. Because additional openings are unlikely we encourage you to register for another course, if one is of interest. Registering for another course will not change your waitlist position.

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching works to build the capacity of education leaders and practitioners to apply improvement science in their schools, organizations, and networks. Improvement science is an approach to making change that combines analytic discipline and practical on-the-ground tools to accelerate progress on pressing educational problems. The methods within improvement science support change agents in deeply understanding problems and their causes, testing ideas for change, and spreading promising practices to new contexts. Through an improvement science approach, the “learning by doing” that occurs in individual clinical practice can cumulate in robust, practical field knowledge capable of reliably producing quality outcomes across diverse contexts.

The pre-conference course is ideal for participants seeking a comprehensive overview of the basic tenets and tools of improvement science. It will provide an introduction to the foundational concepts in improvement science, hands-on activities with key improvement tools, and a case study of how this approach has been applied in education.

 Objectives

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify key concepts and principles that underpin the improvement science approach to change
  • Understand how aim statements and theories of practice improvement discipline improvement efforts
  • Explore how measurement is used in an improvement context
  • Describe how change ideas are developed, iteratively tested, and spread to achieve quality results, reliably at scale
Presenters

Melissa Chabran, Associate, Networked Improvement Science, Carnegie Foundation
Patrice Dawkins-Jackson, Networked Improvement Science Fellow, Carnegie Foundation
Anna Kawar, Co-Founder and Chief Growth Officer, Leading Through Connection
Ke Wu, Associate, Networked Improvement Science, Carnegie Foundation

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(PC2) Organizing to Work in a Networked Improvement Community

Educators, researchers, and policymakers have struggled to find ways of efficiently and effectively applying evidence-based knowledge to the continuous process of solving practical, on-the-ground problems. Networked improvement communities (NICs) provide the necessary organizational structure for mobilizing the diverse expertise needed to solve the most pressing problems that plague our nation’s colleges and schools.

This pre-conference course provides an introduction to using the principles of improvement science within a networked improvement community. Participants will learn the essentials of initiating an effective NIC, including how to develop a disciplined approach to identifying the specific problem and analyzing the system that produces it. This course also explains the role and functions of a NIC hub and provides practical advice about how to establish a culture that supports collective learning. It is intended for those interested in, but not yet familiar with or deeply engaged in, working as a NIC. We encourage people to participate in small teams of two to seven members who want to work on a shared core problem.

Objectives

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how a networked improvement community approach differs from other forms of collaborations
  • Identify key concepts and tools that should be part of your network initiation toolkit
  • Understand the functions and possible structures for a network hub
  • Begin developing a charter for a NIC organized around a high-leverage problem of practice
Presenters

Manuelito Biag, Associate, Networked Improvement Science, Carnegie Foundation
Edit Khachatryan, Associate, Networked Improvement Science, Carnegie Foundation
Emma Parkerson, Associate, Networked Improvement Science, Carnegie Foundation
Barbara Shreve, Networked Improvement Science Fellow, Carnegie Foundation

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(PC3) Using Data for Quality Improvement

NOTE: Enrollment in this course has reached capacity. To be added to the waitlist, email summitreg@carnegiefoundation.org with your first and last name, organization name and the course you want to attend. A waitlist confirmation will be sent within 48 hours. Because additional openings are unlikely we encourage you to register for another course, if one is of interest. Registering for another course will not change your waitlist position.

Schools have made significant headway in collecting data on student learning in the interest of driving change. But how do we embed data collection and use in ongoing processes to continuously improve practices and performance? The nature of the data and the processes in which they are used needs to be shaped to support continuous quality improvement.

This pre-conference course delves into how to develop and use measurement and data. Participants will learn to link their improvement ideas to concrete measures in order to understand if and how their system is improving. They will also learn about using data to examine variation and understand systems, how to create a system of measures to support improvement plans, and the resources and routines that underpin effective data use.

This Pre-Conference Course is ideal for:
  • Educators and other district staff employing improvement science methods in their local contexts to address persistent problems of practice
  • Teachers, faculty, improvement partners, and researchers involved in networked improvement communities
Objectives:

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how to use measures to see systems and more deeply understand problems
  • Consider what types of measures constitute a system of measures to support practice improvement
  • Understand how to work with partners and within NICs to design, develop, refine, and implement common measures focused on a specific theory of improvement
Presenters

Jon Norman, Associate, Analytics, Carnegie Foundation
David Sherer, Networked Improvement Science Fellow, Carnegie Foundation
Sola Takahashi, Senior Research Associate, WestEd

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(PC4) Collaboration and Group Decision-Making

A leadership dilemma: on one hand, leaders want their groups to fully understand and endorse a decision. On the other hand, a thoughtful, inclusive, participatory process takes more time; and requires more patience, more tolerance of conflict, and more commitment to keep showing up. Expedient decisions may not be collaborative, but they at least have the appearance of getting things done. In a few words: should leaders pursue a superficial quick fix, or deeper but slower buy-in?

Adapted from The Facilitator’s Guide To Participatory Decision-Making — a text that has influenced two generations of leaders interested in putting inclusive, participatory values into practice in their organizations – this course provides a fast-paced overview of key insights on group dynamics, consensus building, and the leader’s role in participatory meetings. Combining lecture, group discussion, and small-group interactions, the activities will allow participants to practice applying these concepts to their own real-life situations. The afternoon builds on the morning’s conceptual framework, and focuses on experiential skill-building. Everyone will receive coaching and peer feedback, as Nelli demonstrates how to install customized decision rules with teams.

Objectives:

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand key insights of group dynamics and consensus building
  • Explore the leader’s role in participatory meetings
  • Apply the dynamics of group decision-making to real-life situations
  • Put participatory values into practice within organizations
  • Establish clear decision rules with teams and facilitate participatory meetings
Presenter

Nelli Noakes, Professional Organization Effectiveness Consultant, Community At Work

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(PC5) Putting Research into Practice: Leadership for System Transformation

Wondering what improvement science looks like in a school district that has achieved results? This pre-conference course will help connect the dots. Leaders, teachers, and coaches from the School District of Menomonee Falls (SDMF) and Studer Education℠ will guide participants through the district’s six-year journey of developing leaders and applying improvement science to accelerate system, school, and student learning. Participants will first learn about the core principles underlying systemic improvement in SDMF and be introduced to the organization’s transformational approach to methodical, continuous improvement. Building upon this broad, system-level view, participants will learn how to grow and develop leaders who can effectively lead change, empower teachers to improve student and school results through cycles of improvement, and develop students who can analyze their own challenges and make smart decisions to advocate for their own learning needs. Along the way, presenters will offer specific examples from SDMF of connecting to hearts and minds to drive results and stimulate ongoing organizational learning.

Objectives

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Engage an elected board to understand, appreciate, and drive improvement through resource allocation and policy adoption
  • Train and coach a collaborative leadership team, through the continuous change of education institutions, to lead as a team, with both their hearts and minds
  • Build aligned scorecards of key metrics and high-leverage actions that drive improvement at the district, school, and classroom level
  • Report scorecard progress using a simple, 45-day cycle that supports improvement through agile adjustment to achieve results
  • Coach teachers to plan, do, study, and act with students, so that each student knows and advocates for their own progress
  • Ensure that improvement is everyone’s job, from superintendent to food service employee, from student to board member.
Presenters

Patricia Greco, Superintendent of Schools, School District of Menomonee Falls
Corey Golla, Director of Curriculum and Learning, School District of Menomonee Falls
Melissa Matarazzo, Lead Coach, Studer Education
Suzy Thomas, Associate Principal, Menomonee Falls High School

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(PC6) Getting Inside the “How” of District-Wide Success

Given that school districts are now expected to lead school improvement in a state context, the question becomes, do they have the capacity to do so? The presenters of this course have been working on strategies for district-wide success with a number of districts. In addition, they’ve recently developed four hypothetical simulation case studies addressing how school districts address this task. Cases are based on the “Coherence Framework” featured in Coherence: the Right Drivers in Action for Schools, Districts, and Systems, by Michael Fullan and Joanne Quinn.

The presenters will introduce their framework and the cases, and engage participants in small groups to examine the cases, explore questions, and derive critical practical lessons for leading district-wide reform.

Objectives

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Identify insights into how effective districts of varying sizes obtain success in terms of the students’ learning agendas
  • Work on district plans with the view toward leaving the session with some practical ideas for application to their own settings
  • Understand the role of districts in the context of state-wide reform
  • Ultimately empower districts to become agents of change in their own local jurisdictions and in the state as a whole
Presenters

Michael Fullan, Professor Emeritus, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
Eleanor Adam, Senior Consultant, Michael Fullan Enterprises Capacity Building Team
Carlye Olsen-Marousek, Director of Accountability, Staff Development, and Curriculum & Instruction, Whittier Union High School District
Sandy Thorstenson, Former Superintendent, Whittier Union High School District

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(PC7) Unleashing Large-Scale Social Change

In the realm of large-scale change, success requires losing control of thousands people moving in the desired direction. The Billions Institute calls this “Unleashing.” Participants in this course will learn how to apply this Model for Unleashing to their own scaling efforts. Through a candid case-study of the 100,000 Homes Campaign, which housed more than 100,000 chronically homeless Americans, the presenters will highlight the do’s and don’ts of orchestrating change across a large geographic area. Participants will also hear from leaders in the field of education about their experiences of applying the Model for Unleashing. This session will be especially useful for active practitioners of large-scale change, though that is not a requirement for attending.

Objectives

After this course, participants will be able to:

  • Apply the Model for Unleashing to design and implement large-scale change initiatives
  • Create a compelling 18-36 month spread/scale aim
  • Choose suitable methods for increasing awareness, deepening will, and supporting behavior-change
  • Describe a culture of operation that embraces fast learning and rapid adjustment in pursuit of spread/scale aims
Presenters

Becky Margiotta, CEO and President, Billions Institute
Joe McCannon, Co-Founder and Senior Advisor, Billions Institute
Karen Zeribi, Founder & Principal Improvement Advisor, Shift-Results

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